Friday, June 17, 2016

A quick photo from home.

Been doing some testing of different pieces of equipment at home. This limits some of my observing time at HJRO.

Below is a sample test session the lunar image isn't very good. Because I setup the equipment very quickly and the camera wasn't square with the optical path. My attempts at sharpening the image were a little overdone as well.

https://flic.kr/p/JcDR3u


It takes a lot longer to put a post out in blog press on the iPhone now. This is because the site doesn't allow pictures to be easily uploaded. So I have to put them on Flickr.

Blog press used to be a wonderful tool for the iPhone and iPad but now it's pretty backward
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Monday, May 30, 2016

We will be opening up HJRO at 9:30pm tonight

I've been not updating this observing blog much. Been busy with family issues but also I've been getting involved in learning to use some new solar equipment I picked up.

We obviously, won't be looking at the sun tonight. We will focus on Jupiter, Saturn and especially Mars later in the evening.

Mars is closer to the earth than it has been in the past 8 years.

Hopefully we will have some good observing and perhaps we will get some decent photos through the c14.

Hope to see you at the observatory.

Greg

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Sunday, March 20, 2016

Another live view shot of the moon on the TV monitor at HJRO


2010 visitor at HJRO


Here's one of the nearby residents in Lincoln Park, who visited the observatory.  This guy used to visit the observatory way back in the 1970's as well.  So I've probably seen him as a visitor when I was in the old Junior High and now much later.  The observatory is open free to anyone who wants to stop by and visit.  Whenever we are open.  Of course the trick is driving by and finding us open on a clear night. 

Live TV view of the moon using the Stellacam 3

Here is a sample of what we'd see on the TV monitor if we were viewing the moon.

Live view on TV monitor of a comet


Here was a live view of one of the comets we viewed from some years back perhaps 2011.  I'd have to look up the details in the old posts.  Basically this is a view we had live on a TV monitor using our black and white stellacam 3 camera.   The camera was mounted to one of the telescopes.


Old Telescope tube at night


Here is another photo of the old tube, this time at night with a time lapse exposure showing the constellation Orion in the background above the large 9 foot tube.  You can make out my "ghost" exposure to see the size of that old tube.   For about a year we stored the old tube at a friends house, thinking about how much effort it would take to do a full restoration of the tube and mirror.   Eventually the tube was removed and a different member of the club actually took it home as a kind of geeky Astronomy item.  It's gifted to and hanging in the garage of one of the FAAC members now, saved from the dumpster.